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Wet Wraps Cut Need For Drugs In Kids With Eczema

Study gives parents, doctors new options to treat painful, itchy condition
 


DENVER, CO -- July 8, 2014 -- The number of children with atopic dermatitis, often referred to as eczema, is on the rise. Some estimate that one in five children in the U.S. now suffers from the painful, itchy skin condition. In an effort to control their symptoms, many children are prescribed powerful medications like immunosuppressants or topical steroids. 
 


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Those With Ragweed Allergies Will Get New Relief This Fall, Thanks To Timely FDA Approval Of New Therapy

Tablets mark latest shift in immunotherapy, could make allergy shots unnecessary for many

DENVER, CO -- Thanks to the timely approval of a new tablet by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), millions of Americans who suffer from ragweed allergies will have a new, at-home option for treatment this fall.

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E-Cigarettes Helping Spark New ISmoke Generation

In one year, middle and high school students who tried e-cigarettes doubled to nearly two million

DENVER, CO -- March 17, 2014 -- While major cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles have taken steps to ban the use of e-cigarettes in most public places, national authorities have done little to keep them out of the hands of children.

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FDA Approves Nation's First Prescription-Strength Tablet To Treat Hay Fever Allergies

Tablets mark latest shift in immunotherapy, could make allergy shots unnecessary for many

DENVER, CO -- April 1, 2014 -- For the first time in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of daily tablets to treat hay fever, particularly allergies to grass and ragweed pollen.

It’s estimated that more than 17 million Americans suffer from hay fever, many of whom are aggravated by grass pollen in the spring and summer and by ragweed in the fall.

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Bacteria In Soil, Shower Heads Can Pose Threat

Study finds tall, thin women may be more vulnerable to the bacterial lung infection ‘NTM’

DENVER, CO -- August 27, 2013 -- Tall, thin women face a greater risk of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), an organism closely related to those that cause tuberculosis, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. Their study appears in a recent publication of The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care.

“What we are finding is that there are more women with this infection than men, and strikingly, there is more disease among white women who are tall and thin,” said Michael Iseman, MD, co-author of the study and a professor of medicine at National Jewish Health.

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